Course1

Choice of Entity for Service Businesses

$79.00

Familiar tradeoffs in choice of entity for businesses selling goods are scrambled when it comes to service-based businesses. This is particularly true with regard to tax law and the relatively new deduction for certain types of income in pass-through businesses. Choice of entity for service businesses also differ in consideration of distributions and employment taxes, incentive compensation and vesting of restricted ownership interests, and the eventual sale, liquidation or accession of new owners.  This program will provide you with practical guide to choice of entity for service businesses with special emphasis on the new tax law.   How the new deductions for pass-through income applies to service businesses What income and types of businesses are covered or not Regulatory, industry, finance and other non-tax considerations for service businesses Using multiple entities to achieve variable ownership, management and tax goals Converting entities if a prior choice of entity is no longer sound   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Valuation of Closely Held Companies

$79.00

Virtually every transaction of a closely held company requires a valuation. The company may be selling itself or some of its assets; obtaining a loan or placing equity with new investor; or the valuation may be needed for trust and estate planning. But valuing a closely held company is much art as science because there is no regular and liquid market matching buyers and sellers. This can make valuation highly contentious as parties argue over add-backs, discounts and premiums, and how to “price” cash flow or earnings. And all the familiar calculations have been altered by recent tax law changes. This program will provide you a real-world guide to valuation methodologies, areas of common dispute, and drafting tips. Valuation methodologies depending on the type of business or asset – asset-based, cash flow, market comps, and intrinsic value Role of objective factors v. professional judgment Impact of recent tax law changes on valuation Valuation premiums and discounts – “fair market value” and “fair value” Valuation drafting issues for lawyers Costly valuation mistakes and how to reduce risk of dispute   Speaker:

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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Closely Held Stock Options, Restricted Stock, Etc.

$79.00

Equity-based compensation is often essential to recruiting and retaining key employees in closely held companies.  Whether through the use of stock options, restricted stock, appreciation rights or other instruments and techniques, incentive compensation aligns the financial interests of key employees with the entity. Incentive compensation also often has the benefit of not requiring the immediately outlay of cash. Depending on the instruments used, equity-based compensation may also help defer tax recognition.  Compensation in LLCs takes on different forms but functions similarly. This program will provide you with a practical guide to equity-based incentive compensation in closely held companies. C and S Corp incentive compensation v. pass-through entity incentive compensation Eligibility for tax-favored Incentive Stock Options v. non-qualified stock options Use of restricted stock – valuation, vesting, and treatment Appreciation rights in corporate and pass-through entities Common structuring and drafting traps Tax treatment, advantages and disadvantages of incentive compensation   Speaker:

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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Director and Officer Liability

$79.00

Statutory and common law impose certain fiduciary duties – of care, diligence, good faith and fair dealing – on directors and managers of corporate entities, managers of LLCs, and, in certain instances, members of LLCs. The corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines also operate to restrict the activity of closely held company stakeholders, preventing misappropriation of certain corporate or LLC opportunities.  In certain instances, the owners of the entity may want to expand, limit, or eliminate these duties.  Depending on the entity involved and the specific duty, the law may allow modification by agreement, but unintended consequences may be substantial. This program will provide you with a practical guide to fiduciary duties in corporations and LLCs, how they may be modified, and the practical consequences.  Fiduciary duties and standards of review – duty of loyalty and duty of care Conflicts of interest and self-dealing issues in closely held corporations Fiduciary duties in LLCs – standards set by contract and by law What duties may be modified or eliminated – and which may not Corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines in closely held companies   Speakers:

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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Reps and Warranties in Business Transactions

$79.00

Representations and warranties are a marquee feature of virtually every significant transaction.  Parties often conduct extensive due diligence but want specific assurances about important facts about which only the company would have the best information. These facts – e.g., the absence of liabilities or the presence of certain authorizations – can be few or great in number, and they vary according to the facts of the transaction. They are essential to most transactions. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the differences between reps and warranties, the types and their remedies, and drafting. Differences between reps and warranties, and their remedies Relationship between diligence and reps and warranties – and what the law says about how one impacts the other Reps and warranties concerning tangible and intangible property – title, taxes, transfer restrictions Provisions covering revenue projections, financial statements, and customer lists Understanding the limits of reps and warranties – what you can ask for, what you can get   Speaker:

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Course1

Drafting Business Service Agreements

$79.00

Companies are increasingly focused on their “core competencies,” outsourcing all other functions – sales, bookkeeping, IT, customer and product support, warranty work – to third party professionals and their companies.  Drafting agreements to capture this work is unlike drafting a conventional employment agreement.  It requires a sophisticated understanding of the service, benchmarks for performance and reporting, the protection of highly confidential business information, and much more. The underlying agreement must carefully create the complex interactions of all of these elements for the client to get the benefit of its bargain.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting services agreements in business.  Drafting services agreements for “hard” and “soft” services Scope of services provided, modification of services, and relationship to fees Performance standards and timeliness of delivery of services Types of fee structures and common traps Ensuring ownership of key files, records, “know how,” customer lists, and trade secrets Issues related to sub-contracting, designation of agents, and assignment of the contract Conflicts of interest, limitation of liability, and indemnification    Speaker:  

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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

The Law of Consignments: How Selling Goods for Others Works

$79.00

In a consignment, the consignor, ships or transfers control of goods to a seller, the consignee, who agrees to market the property to buyers and pay over some portion of the sales proceeds to the consignor. The arrangement involves an intricate set of rights and obligations among the parties. There are also substantial and often overlooked risks, including that the consignee’s creditors may seek to claim a security interest in the consigned property.  If these risks are not properly understood and remedies not carefully considered, the consignor is at risk of loss. This program will provide you to the law of consignments, UCC Article 9 issues and risks, and provide practical tips for drafting consignment agreements. Structure of common consignment transactions Parties, rights and obligations – consignor as creditor, consignee as debtor, creditors Risks of loss to consignor and how it can protect itself against consignee’s creditors Consignor remedies for consignee breach Law of consignments and relationship to secured finance Circumstances when UCC Article 9 does not apply to consignments   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Sophisticated Choice of Entity, Part 2

$79.00

Choosing the right entity for a closely held business is not only a choice in time but planning for long stretches of time and the likelihood of substantial change. Among those changes are changes in tax law, changes in the capital structure and ownership ranks of the company, and changes in business strategy. These and a multitude of other considerations often involve a sophisticated tradeoff of benefits and costs, balancing certainty with flexibility, in full knowledge that change is certain.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to sophisticated choice of entity considerations for closely held businesses.  Day 1: Impact of industry norms, investor expectations, and regulatory requirements Management and information rights, and the ability to restrict Fiduciary duties/liability of owners and managers, and the ability to modify these duties Economic rights – choosing among capital rights, income rights, tracking rights Special considerations for service-based businesses   Day 2: Anticipating liquidity events – sale of the company, liquidation of the company, new investors/members Planning for distributions of property When the first choice wasn’t correct – considerations when an entity needs to convert Impact of recent tax law changes, employment taxes, and SALT considerations Owner and employee fringe benefit considerations   Speaker:

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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Sophisticated Choice of Entity, Part 1

$79.00

Choosing the right entity for a closely held business is not only a choice in time but planning for long stretches of time and the likelihood of substantial change. Among those changes are changes in tax law, changes in the capital structure and ownership ranks of the company, and changes in business strategy. These and a multitude of other considerations often involve a sophisticated tradeoff of benefits and costs, balancing certainty with flexibility, in full knowledge that change is certain.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to sophisticated choice of entity considerations for closely held businesses.  Day 1: Impact of industry norms, investor expectations, and regulatory requirements Management and information rights, and the ability to restrict Fiduciary duties/liability of owners and managers, and the ability to modify these duties Economic rights – choosing among capital rights, income rights, tracking rights Special considerations for service-based businesses   Day 2: Anticipating liquidity events – sale of the company, liquidation of the company, new investors/members Planning for distributions of property When the first choice wasn’t correct – considerations when an entity needs to convert Impact of recent tax law changes, employment taxes, and SALT considerations Owner and employee fringe benefit considerations   Speaker:

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY; Taxation of Settlements & Judgments in Civil Litigation

$79.00

Two of the questions clients have about settlements are: Is the settlement taxable? And if so, how?  The answers to these questions turn on the nature of the underlying claim(s) giving rise to the settlement.  Some settlements are taxed as ordinary income, subjecting income tax and employment tax withholding in certain instances.  Other types of settlements are taxable as capital gains. There are also questions related to the treatment of that portion of the settlement, if any, attributable to attorneys’ fees.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the tax treatment of settlements in civil litigation.   How the underlying claim giving rise to a settlement determines its tax treatment Loss of income or gross business profit v. destruction of capital property Special treatment for physical injury Treatment of portion of settlement attributable to attorneys’ fees Income and employment tax withholding from settlements   Speaker: Stephen J. Turanchik is an attorney in the Los Angeles office of Paul Hastings, LLP, where his practice focuses on tax litigation at the state and federal levels as well as tax controversy work at the administrative levels. Before entering private practice, he is previously litigated for six years for the U.S. Department of Justice, Tax Division, where he litigated over 300 tax cases in federal, bankruptcy, state and probate court. He has also lectured at Loyola Law School and California State University, Fullerton on topics relating to tax litigation and is chair-elect of the executive committee of the Los Angeles Bar Association’s Tax Section. Mr. Turanchik received his B.A. from the College of the Holy Cross, his J.D. from Fordham University School of Law, and his LL.M. in Taxation from New York University School of Law.

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Piercing the Entity Veil: Individual Liability for Business Acts

$79.00

One of the bedrock principles of business law is limited liability. The individual owners of an entity – shareholders of a corporation or members of a limited liability company – cannot be held personally liable for the debts or liabilities of the entity.  But the doctrine is not absolute.  There are many common law fact patterns that allow courts to pierce the entity veil – co-mingling of funds, using an entity as an alter ego, among others – and reach an individual person’s assets. There are also several sources of statutory authority allowing veil piercing. This program will provide you with a practical guide to common law, equitable, and statutory theories of piercing entity veils. Statutory and equitable principles to pierce the entity veil Fact pattern justifying piercing limited liability to reach an owner’s personal assets Statutory sources permitting breaching the entity veil Application of veil piercing to non-corporate entities Liability for improper distributions Piercing for withheld income and employment taxes, and sales/use taxes   Speakers:

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Equipment Leases: Drafting & UCC Article 2A Issues

$79.00

  Many companies lease rather than buy computers and servers, company cars and other capital equipment.  These leases are government by UCC Article 2A, an intricate set of provisions governing their validity, treatment, and enforcement.  If the lease is not properly drafted to comply with the UCC, it risks being re-characterized as a sale or a security interest, which give rise to substantially adverse financial and tax consequences. This program will also provide you with a practical guide to reviewing equipment leases, including spotting red flags and avoiding recharacterization. Types of equipment leases – “true” leases, synthetic leases, “lease to own” arrangements, and more Spotting red flags of financeable leases – and how to ensure UCC 2A compliance Rights and obligations of the parties – manufacturer, lessor and lessee – and remedies for breach Circumstances leading to re-characterization of a “true lease” as a sale or financing Adverse financial, tax and practical ramifications of lease re-characterization   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.    

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Service Level Agreements in Technology Contracting

$79.00

In a world where every client depends on IT functions – web site hosting, e-commerce, telecom, storing files remotely in the Cloud, or on locally leased servers, e-mail and much more – and when most of these functions are outsourced or provided by vendors, Service Level Agreements (SLAs) are of paramount importance. SLAsset benchmarks forthese services – what uptime is expected and for how long, what happens when something goes down, how is service measured and reported?  The operation of every business and every law firm rests on the answer to these questions. This program will provide you a practical guide to reviewing, drafting and negotiating SLAs for client IT functions.  Purpose of SLAs – ensuring clients get benefit of bargain, incentivizing providers Types of services – locally installed v. the Cloud Service availability – uptime, guarantees, exclusions Service performance – minimum v. expected service, resolution time v. resolution goals Special considerations when drafting for the Cloud Common failures, damages, and remedies   Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Successor Liability in Business Transactions

$79.00

It’s axiomatic that the sale of an asset does not carry with it the seller’s liabilities apart from any liability that may attach to the asset itself, such a lien. But there are substantial exceptions to this rule. In many instances, the asset buyer becomes liable, by operation of law, for the seller’s assets. If this liability arises, it can easily undo the basic economic assumptions of the parties entering the transaction. This program will provide you with a real world guide to identifying the risks of successor liability in transactions, including liability under common and statutory law, bankruptcy law, and discuss drafting techniques to reduce the risk of successor liability. Fact patterns giving rise to successor liability – business continuation, fraud, product line continuation, and more Buyer liability at UCC Article 9 foreclosure sales Successor liability under federal employment and environmental statutes and under state sales/use tax law Drafting techniques to limit or eliminate the risk of liability   Speaker: Bill Kelly is a founding member and managing partner of Kelly & Walker LLC with nearly 30 years’ experience in the areas of class action, commercial and employment litigation.  As national litigation counsel to several large companies, Bill has been lead trial counsel in over 18 states and U.S. territories.  Bill is an A/V Rated attorney in Martindale-Hubbell who has been listed as a Colorado Super Lawyer, a Top Lawyer in US News & World Report, and a leader in employment law by Chambers USA.  In a survey of Fortune 500 General Counsel, Bill has been named to BTI’s list of Client Service All Stars for 7 consecutive years.  Bill is a fellow of the Litigation Counsel of America Trial Lawyer’s Honor Society and a member of the International Association of Defense Counsel.  

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Basics of Cyber-Attack Liability and Protecting Clients Interests

$79.00

Every company that stores files in the cloud, has a Web site, or engages in e-commerce is a data breach waiting to happen. Cyber attacks have become more frequent and more sophisticated, breaching even federal security agencies and global finance companies.  Every smaller company is constructively on notice that they may the next victim of a malicious breach. When that happens, clients often turn to their lawyers and ask, what now and are we liable? This program will provide lawyers with a real world guide to advising clients about data breaches – what they are, how to protect themselves legally, and what to do if it’s too late. Framework of law of cyber security – sources of liability under federal and state law What constitutes a data breach and your client’s obligation to protect against breaches Data breach notification laws – what must you disclose and when Risk of private causes of action and best practices to avoid Policies, processes and agreements to protect against – or respond to a data breach   Speaker: Sue C. Friedberg is a partner in the Pittsburg office of Buchanan, Ingersoll & Rooney, PC, where she is co-chair of Buchan’s Cyber Security and Data Protection Group.  She advises clients about rapidly evolving standards of care for safeguarding confidential information and responding effectively to security incidents that threaten to compromise their valuable or protected information.  She helps clients asses their data security risks and capabilities, develop information security programs, design incident response plans and prepare and update contracts. Ms. Friedberg earned her B.S., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and her J.D., cum laude, from the University of Pittsburg School of law.

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Drafting Stockholder Agreements, Part 2

$79.00

Stockholders’ agreements are the most important operational documents for closely held companies.Boards of directors may be established and stock authorized by Articles of Incorporation, but stockholders’ agreements are where the practical allocation of voting power and economic rights are defined. These agreements determine access to information about the company, how major corporate decisions are approved, distribution policy, and often impose restrictions on the transfer of stock.  In the context of S Corporations, these agreements take on even more importance in the form of various restrictions to ensure the corporation does not lose its pass-through status for federal income tax purposes. This program will provide you with a guide to planning and drafting the most essential provisions of stockholders’ agreements for C and S corporations.   Day 1: Practical uses of stockholders’ agreements Management and voting rights – what events trigger a vote and by whom Economic rights – distributions, taxes, and liquidations Information rights – access to operational, financial and tax information   Day 2: Restrictions on transferability and mechanisms to buy/sell restricted stock Valuation methodologies for stock that does not have a liquid market Protective provisions for S Corps – preventing transfers to ineligible holders Provisions for approving the termination an S Corp election Close corporations and the ability to govern the company without a board of directors   Speaker:

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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Drafting Stockholder Agreements, Part 1

$79.00

  Stockholders’ agreements are the most important operational documents for closely held companies.Boards of directors may be established and stock authorized by Articles of Incorporation, but stockholders’ agreements are where the practical allocation of voting power and economic rights are defined. These agreements determine access to information about the company, how major corporate decisions are approved, distribution policy, and often impose restrictions on the transfer of stock.  In the context of S Corporations, these agreements take on even more importance in the form of various restrictions to ensure the corporation does not lose its pass-through status for federal income tax purposes. This program will provide you with a guide to planning and drafting the most essential provisions of stockholders’ agreements for C and S corporations.  Day 1: Practical uses of stockholders’ agreements Management and voting rights – what events trigger a vote and by whom Economic rights – distributions, taxes, and liquidations Information rights – access to operational, financial and tax information   Day 2: Restrictions on transferability and mechanisms to buy/sell restricted stock Valuation methodologies for stock that does not have a liquid market Protective provisions for S Corps – preventing transfers to ineligible holders Provisions for approving the termination an S Corp election Close corporations and the ability to govern the company without a board of directors   Speaker:    

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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Course1

Arbitration Clauses in Business Agreements

$79.00

One of the biggest risks in most business, commercial, or real estate agreements is the risk of dispute and costly, protracted litigation. Arbitration agreements are one of the primary methods by which this substantial risk of loss is contained. Rather than the parties resorting to costly litigation, they are required to seek resolution of their dispute before a neutral arbiter, whose decision in the matter is final and cannot be litigated. Though these agreements are effective mechanisms for dispute resolution and cost containment, they are also highly controversial. This program will provide you with a practical guide the law governing arbitration agreements and drafting their major provisions. Framework of law governing arbitration agreements Practical uses in business, commercial, and real estate transactions Circumstances where arbitration is effective v. ineffective Counseling clients about the benefits, risks, and tradeoffs of arbitration agreements Scope of arbitration, mandatory nature, and rules used Defining applicable law, arbiter selection, and method of arbitration Judgment on award, review by courts (if any), interim relief   Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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"I Want Out!": Exit Rights in Business Agreements

$79.00

A client investment in an operating business, particularly a minority stake, is only as good as its liquidity.  If a client cannot readily sell his or her ownership stake at fair market value, it has little real value. The key to ensuring liquidity is contractually creating a private market for the ownership stake.  This market can come in the form of requiring other stakeholders, including the majority owner, to buy the minority stake at a mutually agreeable price, or creating other mechanisms for selling the stake to third parties. Without these contract rights, a stakeholder has no liquidity and is stuck. This program will provide you with a practical to planning and drafting contractual liquidity rights in closely held companies. Planning and drafting liquidity rights in closely held companies Counseling clients about the limitations and risks of liquidity in closely held companies Framework of alternatives for determining most appropriate liquidity rights “Texas standoff” or “Russian roulette” – opportunities, risks and tradeoffs Drafting “tag-along” and “drag-along” rights – practical uses and drawbacks How to think about valuing closely held ownership stakes   Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

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  • 60
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  • 12/23/2021
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The Ins-and-Out of Licensing Technology, Part 2

$79.00

To Be Determined

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/7/2020
    Presented
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The Ins-and-Out of Licensing Technology, Part 1

$79.00

To Be Determined

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 10/6/2020
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Raising Capital: Private Placements Agreements for Closely Held Companies, Part 2

$79.00

Private placement of equity and debt is essential to financing the growth and development of businesses of every size.  Whenever a client issue stock or other ownership interests in a C Corp S Corp or LLC they are subject to a complex network of federal and state securities regulations.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the fundamentals of private placements including the types of private placements the dollar amount and investor limitations on each type of private placement under securities law drafting the relevant documents and practical tips on accessing the capital market and for successful placements.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/4/2020
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Raising Capital: Private Placements Agreements for Closely Held Companies, Part 1

$79.00

Private placement of equity and debt is essential to financing the growth and development of businesses of every size.  Whenever a client issue stock or other ownership interests in a C Corp S Corp or LLC they are subject to a complex network of federal and state securities regulations.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the fundamentals of private placements including the types of private placements the dollar amount and investor limitations on each type of private placement under securities law drafting the relevant documents and practical tips on accessing the capital market and for successful placements.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 9/3/2020
    Presented
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Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 2

$79.00

To Be Determined

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/19/2020
    Presented
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Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 1

$79.00

To Be Determined

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/18/2020
    Presented
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Earnouts: Taking a Wait and See Approach to Valuation of Closely Held Companies

$79.00

To Be Determined

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/2/2020
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Piercing the Entity Veil: Individual Liability for Business Acts

$79.00

One of the bedrock principles of business law is limited liability. The individual owners of an entity – shareholders of a corporation or members of a limited liability company – cannot be held personally liable for the debts or liabilities of the entity.  But the doctrine is not absolute.  There are many common law fact patterns that allow courts to pierce the entity veil – co-mingling of funds, using an entity as an alter ego, among others – and reach an individual person’s assets. There are also several sources of statutory authority allowing veil piercing. This program will provide you with a practical guide to common law, equitable, and statutory theories of piercing entity veils. Statutory and equitable principles to pierce the entity veil Fact pattern justifying piercing limited liability to reach an owner’s personal assets Statutory sources permitting breaching the entity veil Application of veil piercing to non-corporate entities Liability for improper distributions Piercing for withheld income and employment taxes, and sales/use taxes   Speakers:

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/5/2020
    Presented
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Course1

Closely Held Company Merger & Acquisitions, Part 1

$79.00

  Mergers or buyouts of closely held companies are a complex, multifaceted process.  Agreeing on a valuation can be very difficult because there is no regular market of buyers and sellers and information on comparable sales is scarce. Closely held companies are typically structured to benefit a few shareholders, often members of a family, and require their financial statements and distributions to be normalized. There can also be substantial issues of liability, including successor liability in asset deals, requiring carefully crafted reps and warranties. Confidentiality is often essential in these transactions as sellers try not to unsettle existing commercial relationships and employees. This program will provide you with a practical guide to major planning and drafting considerations in the mergers and buyouts of closely held companies. Day 1: Confidentiality considerations in the sale and negotiation process Due diligence – financial, operational and workforce red flags Stock v. asset transactions and forms of consideration – cash v. equity Valuation of closely held companies in an illiquid market Use or of “earnouts” to bridge the gap in valuation   Day 2 : Reps, warranties, indemnity and basket issues common to closely held companies Successor liability concerns where assets are transferred Asset transfer issues – intangible assets, including intellectual property Transition issues – management, employees, business relationship, contract issues Escrow and post-closing issues   Speakers: Daniel G. Straga is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  Mr. Straga earned his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School and his B.A. from the University of Delaware.   Stephanie Molyneaux is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she assists clients with a wide variety of transactional matters.  Her experience includes mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, contractual agreements, technology transactions, licensing, and intellectual property transactions.  Ms. Molyneaux received her B.A., with distinction, from American University of Beirut and her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Richmond School of Law.  

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/10/2020
    Presented
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Course1

Closely Held Company Merger & Acquisitions, Part 2

$79.00

Mergers or buyouts of closely held companies are a complex, multifaceted process.  Agreeing on a valuation can be very difficult because there is no regular market of buyers and sellers and information on comparable sales is scarce. Closely held companies are typically structured to benefit a few shareholders, often members of a family, and require their financial statements and distributions to be normalized. There can also be substantial issues of liability, including successor liability in asset deals, requiring carefully crafted reps and warranties. Confidentiality is often essential in these transactions as sellers try not to unsettle existing commercial relationships and employees. This program will provide you with a practical guide to major planning and drafting considerations in the mergers and buyouts of closely held companies. Day 1: Confidentiality considerations in the sale and negotiation process Due diligence – financial, operational and workforce red flags Stock v. asset transactions and forms of consideration – cash v. equity Valuation of closely held companies in an illiquid market Use or of “earnouts” to bridge the gap in valuation   Day 2: Reps, warranties, indemnity and basket issues common to closely held companies Successor liability concerns where assets are transferred Asset transfer issues – intangible assets, including intellectual property Transition issues – management, employees, business relationship, contract issues Escrow and post-closing issues   Speakers: Daniel G. Straga is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  Mr. Straga earned his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School and his B.A. from the University of Delaware. Stephanie Molyneaux is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she assists clients with a wide variety of transactional matters.  Her experience includes mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, contractual agreements, technology transactions, licensing, and intellectual property transactions.  Ms. Molyneaux received her B.A., with distinction, from American University of Beirut and her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Richmond School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/11/2020
    Presented
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Course1

Classes of Stock: Structuring voting and non-voting

$79.00

Crafting a corporation’s capital structure to harmonize competing economic interests is among the most challenging aspects of corporate formation. Certain investors want preferred returns of capital and “protective” rights in the form of enhanced voting rights.  They also want a senior claim to the corporation’s assets on liquidation. But common stock is often the largest tranche of a corporation’s capital structure and its claims cannot be entirely truncated in preference of preferred stock.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting corporate common and preferred stock, with an emphasis on drafting preferred returns. Classes and series of sock in a closely held company’s capital structure Dividend rights – who gets what, when, and in preference to whom? Voting rights – preferential governance rights Liquidation rights – preferential claims on a company’s assets Conversion rights for preferred stock Dilution and impairment rights   Speaker: Tyler J. Sewell is n partner in the Denver office of Morrison & Foerster, LLP, where he specializes in mergers and acquisitions.  He focuses his practice on advising financial and strategic buyers and sellers in public and private M&A transactions and complex corporate transactions.  He negotiates and documents leveraged acquisitions, divestitures, asset acquisitions, stock acquisitions, mergers, auction transactions, and cross-border transactions. Mr. Sewell received his B.S., with merit, in ocean engineering from the United States Naval Academy and his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/24/2020
    Presented
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